Shenfield High School

Fun Ways to PREP


1. Key Words Crossword Puzzle

Choose a subject and write down all the key words you need to learn. Find an online Crossword creator, there are a huge number of web sites that can do this for you.

For the clues, write the definition of the key word.

Once the crossword has been created, leave it for a few days/weeks. Then, try and complete it. Don’t forget to print out the answer sheet so you can self-check the answers!

Here is an example below:

 

ACROSS                                                                                                DOWN

2. What does the ‘H’ in SHS stand for?                    1. In what year group do you take A Level exams?

5. What is ‘PREP’ short for?                                         3. What is the surname of our Headteacher?

                                                                                4. In what Year group do you take GCSE exam?                                 

 

2. Key Word Pictionary

 

For this game you will need at least one other person. With a friend or group of friends, decide which subject and set of Key Words you wish to learn or revise. Write them down on individual cards. Try to have a large number so they are not too obvious.

Take it in turns to draw (without using words, symbols or speaking) something that represents the key word you wish to learn.

*Want to Make the Game Harder?*

The other player who is trying to guess the key word can’t say the key word, but must give the correct definition of it!

Here is an example below:

The Easy Answer: An Atom

  1. *The Definition Answer:
  2. The smallest particle of a chemical element that can exist.

 

 

3. Write a Short Story

If you have a large number of facts, figures or key words to remember, write a short story that you can recite to yourself in the exam. The more interesting and funny your story is, the more likely you are to remember the facts.

Here is an example:

To begin our adventure into storytelling, start by reading the paragraph below, which recounts a brief and chaotic story. Your task is simply to understand what happens:

"A man called Nigel is sat next to his enormous, 300lb pet squid as they travel around in the back of his lime-green limo. They're arguing over what to watch on the limo's TV: Coronation Street, or Sesame Street. It soon turns into a fight, which the squid wins by using its eight limbs to empty eight pepper-grinders on to Nigel's head. Nigel leaps from the car in terror and runs away towards the sea, cleverly heading through a thick yellow field of rapeseed to stop the squid from following. On reaching the beach, he meets Prince Harry, who is celebrating his 25th birthday. Prince Harry persuades Nigel to help him confront two Gallic dancers who have eaten a beautiful "she-swan" (without the Queen's permission). After the attack, Nigel jumps into the sea and swims out towards, as luck would have it, the Lady of Shalott, who is bobbing up and down in a boat made from a giant orange pepper. She invites him on board and they fall in love."

It will have taken you perhaps a minute to read through this. This should demonstrate just how quickly and effortlessly your mind can imagine elaborate scenes it has never encountered before.

Your next step is to see how much of the story you recall. First, close your eyes and repeat the story as well as you can in your head. When you're done, open your eyes and write down all the items you have successfully recalled. This will give you a sense of how many useful memories you can store in around a minute or so. Hopefully you'll have impressed yourself again.

Now, you'll perhaps be wondering what the point of remembering a random list of objects like this might be. But here we can reveal that the story you've learned is not at all random, but in fact encodes the ingredients for a Nigel Slater recipe. Hooray! The 300lb squid represents 300g of squid; the lime-green limo is a lime; Coronation Street stands for coriander; Sesame Street for sesame oil; eight pepper grinders for eight crushed peppercorns; the rapeseed field for rapeseed oil; Prince Harry celebrating his birthday for 25g ginger; two Gallic dancers for two cloves of garlic; the "she-swan" for Szechuan pepper; the sea for salt; the Lady of Shalott for shallots; the orange pepper boat for one large orange pepper.

Have a look over these connections. Your last task is to try to remember the ingredients that correspond to each element in the story. Once you've done that, you're ready to make your squid and pepper stir-fry …

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2012/jan/15/story-lines-facts

 

4. Key Term Word Search

Choose a subject and write down all the key words you need to learn. Find an online Word Search creator, there are a huge number of web sites that can do this for you.

For the clues, write the definition of the key word.

Once the word search has been created, leave it for a few days/weeks. Then, try and complete it. Don’t forget to print out the answer sheet so you can self-check the answers!

Here is an example below:

  1. What is ‘PREP’ short for?
  2. What is the surname of our Headteacher?
  3. What year group take their GCSE exams?
  4. What year group take their A Level exams?
  5. What does the ‘H’ in SHS stand for?

 

5. Write a poem

If you have a large number of facts, figures or key words to remember, write a poem that you can re-cite to yourself in the exam. Try and make it rhyme on the key words and throw in their definitions if you can.

 

6. Card Matching Game

Use revision cards. They must all be the same size and colour. On half the cards, write a key word on each. On the other half of the cards, write their definitions on each.

With a friend, turn all the cards so they face down on the table. Each person takes it in turns to turn over two cards. If they turn over the key word and the correct definition, they get to keep them. If the two cards do not match, they must be turned back and it is the next persons turn. The winner is the person with the most cards at the end.

You not only have to remember where the key words and the definitions are, but match them as well!

Here is an example:

A Musical Scale containing only 5 notes.

PENTATONIC SCALE

 

7. Name That Tune!

Choose a song from the charts that you know really well and enjoy singing along to.

Now, re-write the lyrics so they contain all the facts and key words you need to remember. Try to keep to the same number of syllables for each line! Then, sing the words out loud as many times as you need to remember the lyrics.

TIP: Go to youtube or karaoke site and use the backing track/instrumental so you can sing your lyrics along to the beat!

 

8. Alphabet Prep

Challenge yourself to write a key fact, definition or key word for each letter of the alphabet. It works best with a single topic or area. Once you have completed it, memorise it using some of the techniques in this book.

Finally, challenge yourself to recall all the information using the alphabet as your guide and prompt!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Partnerships